A 14 Year Reunion in Glacier NP

[This is the first of three posts describing a brief road trip during July of 2016.]

First is the ‘reunion trip’ to Glacier NP; the second post will describe a few days in Yellowstone NP, and lastly a few days exploring the Big Horn Canyon National Recreation Area near Lovell, Wyoming, Medicine Wheel  National Historic Landmark just east of the Big Horn Canyon, and some hiking and camping nearby in the Big Horn Mountains.

The Backdrop -In 2002 my wife and I traveled to Glacier with about fifteen others from the Twin Cities via Amtrak. The group was traveling in a Southwest Community Education program (via Southwest High School, Minneapolis, MN). When we arrived, everyone went their own way with their own plan for the next ten days. Then we all met at East Glacier Lodge and returned home via Amtrak.

On that trip, Judy and I spent time at Lake McDonald Cabins and hiked the West Lakes Trail to fish Trout Lake (aka ‘the hike from hell.’) We hiked the Highline Trail from Logan Pass to Granite Park Chalet, then went over Swiftcurrent Pass and on down to Swiftcurrent Motor Lodge and Many Glacier on the east side of the Park. We finished up camping a few days at Two Medicine, where we hiked up to Dawson Pass and along the Continental Divide to Pitamakan Pass, then dropped down at Old Man Lake to hike around Rising Wolf Mountain and back to our campsite on Two Medicine Lake. We’d hit bad weather up along the Divide, and got back just as it was getting dark. Next morning we awoke to about two inches of fresh snow- in August! What a trip!

While we met many new friends on that trip, a couple of those new friendships have remained lasting over the past fourteen years. We’ve hiked and traveled with Courtney and Sally, and enjoyed many social outings together. Thus, it was only natural that we’d explore a reunion trip to Glacier.

Fast forward –In late summer of 2015 we began making plans for our return trip to Glacier during the summer of 2016. We wanted to include a stay at Sperry Chalet and visit Sperry Glacier; get up to Granite Park Chalet again, and spend time in Swiftcurrent Valley. Sounded easy enough, but if you’ve ever planned a vacation in Glacier that included lodging reservations, you know nothing is easy! Suffice it to say, we got no Chalet reservations, but ultimately did get pretty good cabin reservations. We decided to pass on Amtrak this time.

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The 2016 Glacier Trip– We planned for one week in the Park, with stays at Apgar, Lake McDonald Cabins and Swiftcurrent Cabins, with day-hikes only, meaning no tents or trail-cooking… more of that ‘lush-living.’ 😉

Sally and Courtney flew both ways and rented a vehicle. Judy and I drove out, visiting Teddy Roosevelt NP briefly, and Judy flew home with Sally and Courtney. After we finished up at Glacier, I met an old friend in Missoula and we continued the trip. I’ll document those travels in future posts.

On day one we all drove to Apgar. Driving up Hwy 93 from Missoula we approached Flathead Lake and viewed the Mission Mountains off to the east, and behind them the Swan Range.

 

Mission Mountains, MT

Mission Mountains and Swan Range in background

 

Going north on Hwy 93 from Missoula to Apgar with the Mission Mountains and the higher Swan Range largely hidden by the clouds.

 

Fort Connah

Fort Connah, the last Hudson Bay Trading Company built in the US in 1847- Historic Marker

 

Mission Mountains foothills settlements

Mission Mountains – the early foothills settlements

 

The Swan Range pretty much represents the western side of the Bob Marshall Wilderness. Beyond them, further east is the Chinese Wall, running along a stretch of the Continental Divide in the Bob Marshall. To the north is Great Bear Wilderness and to the south is Scapegoat Wilderness. Much of it also falls within the Lewis and Clark National Forest. Bob Marshall Wilderness is named after a Montana politician that championed preserving all this wilderness back in the ’30’s- about five million acres. I’ve heard/read that ‘The Bob’ has the highest density of grizzly bears in the lower 48!

Apgar was a very busy place, located just inside the west entrance to the Park (West Glacier), and on the south-west end of ‘Going to the Sun Road’ , the only east-west road  (open seasonally) through Glacier NP (it crosses the Continental Divide). Apgar is also on the southwest end of Lake McDonald. The Lake is ten miles long, over a mile wide and 470′ deep.

 

Lake McDonald from Apgar Village

Lake McDonald from Apgar Village

 

We had dinner in Apgar, and shared a large cabin for the night.  I was tired and was trying to get some sleep, but the ‘girls’ kept yacking, as ‘girls’ are known to do.  Over the next hour or two, the ‘girls’ garnered their new nick-name, the ‘Slumber-Party Girls,’ as they -the group, shall forever be known!

Next morning we took ‘Going to the Sun Road’ along the south-eastern shore of Lake McDonald up to our Cabins at McDonald Lodge. The Lodge was built in 1913, in the style of a hunting lodge.

 

Lake McDonald Lodge

Lake McDonald Lodge, off ‘Going to the Sun Road,’ Glacier NP

 

McDonald Lodge Cabin

Our McDonald Lodge Cabin

 

We had a casual lunch and reviewed our maps to decide which hike we would do the next morning- we had a couple of options we’d talked about, one pretty strenuous (climbing to the Mount Brown Lookout), the other more moderate (hiking the Snyder Creek Trail to Snyder Lake). Both shared a common Trailhead only a mile from our cabins. We’d decided to make our decision when we knew what the weather would be, and now it looked like rain was pretty likely!

After a great breakfast in McDonald Lodge, we grabbed our day-packs and headed for the Trailhead. For a number of reasons, including the weather forecast, we decided to make the less strenuous hike up Snyder Creek to Snyder Lake.

One major consideration in our decision was elevation. Lake McDonald was at 3,150’. The Twin Cities is about 350’. The Mt. Brown lookout was 5.2 mi. one way, with an elevation gain of 4,325’, total elevation of about 7,500’. The Snyder Lake hike was 4.3 mi. one way, with an elevation gain of 2,147’, total elevation of about 5,300’. While Judy and I had been traveling/sleeping  at 3,000’-5,000’ for four days, Courtney and Sally had flown out and slept two nights at 3,000’. Coupled with the rainy forecast and the morning’s heavy overcast, we figured the prudent choice was to avoid the steep, wet trails of Mt. Brown (and possible altitude issues), and hike the Snyder Lake Trail.

 

Snyder Lake Trailhead, Glacier NP

Snyder Lake Trailhead, Glacier NP

 

Snyder Lake Trail, Glacier NP (1)

Snyder Lake Trail, Glacier NP (1)

 

We hit a stretch of trail through waist-high ferns that pretty much covered the trail. Since it had been raining, these ferns assured us we would soon be soaked. I dawned my rain pants in an effort to stay dry, and kept talking to the bears every time we rounded turns in the trail -anywhere my vision ahead was limited. “Yo bear, beer here!” It was early for berries, but this was still bear country.

 

Bear and Mountain Lion Warning

Bear and Mountain Lion Warning Sign

 

Snyder Lake Trail, Glacier NP (2)

Snyder Lake Trail, Glacier NP (2)

 

Snyder Lake Trail, Glacier NP (3)

Snyder Lake Trail, Glacier NP (3), with part of Sperry Glacier

 

While most of Sperry Glacier is on the other side of the ridge, I think this is part of the glacier as well -as shown on the Nat. Geo. topo map (about 7,500′ elevation), just northwest of Edwards Mtn.

After an hour on the trail we had been getting light rain off and on. By the time we reached the Lake, it was pouring rain relentlessly. Everyone got under the trees and put on ponchos and rain jackets in an effort to stay dry. However, as everyone knows -hiking in rain gear doesn’t really keep you dry; it just makes you think you’ll stay dry. Its a fiction, you might as well just walk in the rain –unless it’s cold and windy, then the rain gear will help you stay warm.

 

Time for the rain gear at Snyder Lake

Time for the rain gear at Snyder Lake

 

It took us about an hour and a half to get back to the Trailhead. We had a better pace going down than we did climbing up. Everyone was having a great time. No complaints about the weather, or wet feet! This was a hiking crew with a great attitude, and a large appetite. And we all knew there would be no dehydrated food when we returned for dinner. We returned to our cabins, got cleaned up and met in the Lodge dining room for dinner.

The main topic over dinner was the day’s hike. It was a great dinner; thank you Sally! Then we started planning the next days activities. It was decided we’d go on a Jammer tour of the west side of the Park– from McDonald Lodge east to Logan Pass and back again. These vintage touring coaches were refurbished over a decade ago, and are very popular with the tourists. They also help reduce road congestion in the Park. They operate in both the western and eastern sides of the Park. Check the Glacier website regarding ticket sales, etc.

 

A Jammer tour vehicle

A Jammer touring vehicle

 

Our Jammer ride

Our Jammer ride- me and the ‘Slumber Party Girls’

 

Well, you’ve got to admit, everyone looks happy, happy, happy! And it was nice not having to drive in all the traffic on ‘Going to the Sun Road.’ The driver was very knowledgeable about points of interest, both along the road, and off in the distance.

 

Logan Pass, Glacier NP

Logan Pass, Glacier NP

 

We stopped for a break at Logan Pass and got out to look around and take pictures. Fourteen years ago we all had hiked the Highline Trail from Logan Pass to Granite Park Chalet -following the Garden Wall up and over Haystack Butte. We took a spur trail up to look over and down on Grinnell Glacier from the west, passing a herd of Big Horn Sheep on the way up. I spotted my first grizzly bear off the Granite Park Chalet balcony.

 

Courtney (left), Judy (rear) and Sally (front)

Courtney (left), Judy (rear) and Sally (front), aka ‘The Slumber Party Girls’

 

Highline Trail, Logan Pass

Highline Trail, Logan Pass

 

Haystack Falls

Haystack Falls, flowing from Haystack Butte above. Garden Wall in background

 

Garden Wall, Glacier NP

Garden Wall, Glacier NP

 

A famous landmark at Logan Pass is Reynolds Mtn. It was very overcast with clouds blowing in and out while we were there, so a clear shot was difficult.

 

Reynolds Mtn. (1)

Reynolds Mtn. (1)

 

Reynolds Mtn. (2)

Reynolds Mtn. (2)

 

Falls along Going to the Sun Road

Falls along Going to the Sun Road, near Logan Pass

 

Another glacial valley, West Glacier

Another glacial valley, West Glacier

 

Jagged rocks in the clouds

Jagged rocks just beyond the trees, in the clouds

 

West Glacier (1)

West Glacier (1)

 

West Glacier (2)

West Glacier (2)

 

We took a boat tour of Lake McDonald, and listened to an old Park Ranger narrate the history of the Lake and basically the western side of Glacier Park. No notes, he just talked. He was a character; he loved to talk, knew his stuff and I really enjoyed what he had to say. I thanked him and told him how much I enjoyed it; which he liked hearing.  At about the same time, a fellow blogger -Jennifer, at The Trailhead, posted a story about her run-in with an old Park Ranger up by Kintla Lake, north of McDonald and Bowman Lakes, in the northwest corner of the Park. I found her story interesting and wondered if we could possibly have been talking with the same Ranger -just might be him!

 

North end of Lake McDonald from Tour Boat

North end of Lake McDonald from Tour Boat

 

We had a short time to do one last hike on the West Side.  A short loop around John’s Lake then we crossed ‘Going to the Sun Road’ to follow McDonald Creek back toward the Lodge a couple of miles. Then it would be time for East Glacier.

 

McDonald Falls

McDonald Falls

 

Bridge over McDonald Creek

Bridge over McDonald Creek

 

Deer along McDonald Creek

Deer along McDonald Creek

 

It was time to leave West Glacier and drive to Swiftcurrent. We took Hwy 2 around the south end of the Park, with a stop at East Glacier Lodge, before taking Hwy 89 north to Many Glacier and the Swiftcurrent Motor Lodge and Cabins. After a couple hours on the road, we enjoyed a tasty lunch at East Glacier, and reminisced of our arrival there fourteen years earlier.

 

East Glacier Amtrack Station

East Glacier Amtrak Station

 

East Glacier Lodge (1)

East Glacier Lodge (1)

 

East Glacier Lodge (2)

East Glacier Lodge (2)

 

Judy at East Glacier

Judy can’t quite get her arms around this one!

 

East Glacier Lodge (3)

East Glacier Lodge (3)

 

Departing East Glacier, we drove up Hwy 89 to Bub, MT and turned left following the sign to the Many Glacier Hotel on Swiftcurrent Lake, and the Swiftcurrent Motor Inn and Cabins, not far from the Lake. We were soon driving west along Lake Sherburne, a long narrow body of water, that is fed by Swiftcurrent Lake, a few more miles ahead.

 

Lake Sherburne, Glacier NP

The view along Lake Sherburne, on the way to Many Glacier and Swiftcurrent Inn and Cabins

 

Many Glacier Hotel

Many Glacier Hotel on Swiftcurrent Lake

 

Swiftcurrent Motor Inn and Cabins are a couple more miles down the road and across the Lake from Many Glacier Hotel. We had a couple of cabins reserved at the Inn, checked in and got our gear unloaded. The plan was to meet for dinner in a couple of hours at the Inn’s restaurant.

 

 

The Inn includes a restaurant, office, and a convenience store -with a covered deck and plenty of chairs to relax in, running the full length of the complex. There is also a large parking lot out front capable of holding a couple hundred vehicles- for both Cabin guests and visitors from the nearby campground. The restaurant did quite the business!

On the far-side of the parking lot there is a campground in the forest. The forest sits at the base of Grinnell Point -which runs down from Mt. Grinnell further up the valley near Grinnel Glacier and the Continental Divide. The Garden Wall follows the Divide in this area, but on the other (west) side. In ’02 we took a spur trail up the Garden Wall (from the Highline Trail) to an overlook of Grinnell Glacier – from the west. Now we would be approaching the Glacier from the east.

 

Grinnell Point

Grinnell Point, across Swiftcurrent Inn’s parking lot

 

Behind the Inn and Cabins was Mt. Henkel‘s steep slopes. Here, sightings of mountain goats, Big Horn Sheep and Grizzly bears were common. They could often be spotted from the big parking lot in front of the Inn. It is not uncommon to see spotting scopes and large-lens cameras on tripods, set up in the parking lot with lines of people seeking to see the wildlife on the hillside.

 

Sloping walls of Mt. Henkel behind Swiftcurrent Inn

Sloping walls of Mt. Henkel behind Swiftcurrent Inn

 

Mount Wilbur (1)

Mount Wilbur, aka Heavy Shield, in early morning sun

 

Mount Wilbur as seen from the Inn’s parking lot early one morning. Native Americans (members of the Blackfoot Confederacy) call the Mountain –Heavy Shield, after a Chief of the Blood Nation, a member of the Confederacy. The Bloods were allied with the Kainai, the Peigan and Siksika Nations -all members of the Blackfoot Confederacy.

Chief Heavy Shield was a very powerful leader, and the Blackfoot people were one of the last First Nations to enter into treaties with the Americans in 1855, with the Lamebull Treaty. The Lewis and Clark Expedition avoided Blackfoot territory on more than one occasion, because of their war-like reputation. They acquired horses and firearms in the first half of the 18th century and expanded their territory at the expense of neighboring tribes. They were nomadic buffalo hunters in the American and Canadian plains, and fierce warriors.

 

Mount Wilbur (2)

Heavy Shield, as the sun sets

 

After dinner I talked with some folks out on the deck and found the Grinnell Glacier Trail was still closed because of snow and ice blockages. We had planned to do that hike, and began hearing stories about hikers climbing around the trail closures and getting through. We’d have to investigate further. In the meantime, we’d hike to Iceberg Lake in the morning.

The Iceberg Lake Trail was 4.8 mi. each way, with an elevation gain of only 1,200′.  No problems there, it should be a piece of cake. There was also a junction with the Ptarmigan Lake and Tunnel Trail a couple miles from the Trailhead. If we hiked that also, it would add 3-6 miles depending how far we took it, so we’d think about it as an add-on, as we returned from Iceberg Lake.

The Iceberg Lake Trail shared a common Trailhead with the Ptarmigan Trail near the Swiftcurrent Cabins. We joined a group of about ten people being led by a Ranger; Monica added a lot to the hike in terms of being able to explain what we were seeing, and not seeing -mountains, plants and animals. She was knowledgeable in Glacier’s geology over time and she definitely added-value to our time on the trail. She also emphasized ‘talking to the bears,’ just to let them know you were coming. I liked that, I think it’s a good idea. I also carry bear spray, as did the Ranger.

The trail began with a steep climb for about a mile, then leveled and worked it’s way around Mt. Henkel, which runs behind the Swiftcurrent Inn and Cabins. As we climbed, the surrounding landscape opened up to us. We passed Mt. Wilbur on our left, and could look back to see Grinnell Point, and Mt. Grinnell as we got higher. We were hiking in a forest of lodgepole pine and poplar. Monica stopped to point out some sign of Grizzly bears -claw scratch marks on a nearby lodgepole pine. I’ve seen them before, but it always seems to raise the excitement level for hikers.

 

Grizzly stretch and claw marks on tree

Grizzly stretch and claw marks on tree

 

Soon we came to Ptarmigan Falls, and found other hikers already there. This is a very popular hike, so no surprise seeing others. We took a brief break, with an energy bar and water… the old standbys!

 

Ptarmigan Falls

Ptarmigan Falls

 

After we passed the Falls, we soon took a left at a fork in the trail, and continued on the Iceberg Lake Trail. The other was the Ptarmigan Trail which we’d consider on our return trip. We start climbing the slopes along Wilbur Creek and begin getting a view of our surroundings -Grinnell Point, and Mt. Grinnell, and the Ptarmigan Wall ahead. Slowly the trail turns west and the Iceberg Lake cerque comes into full view.

 

Ptarmigan Falls with Grinnell Point in background

Ptarmigan Falls with Grinnell Point in background near Swiftcurrent Inn

 

Iceberg Lake ahead

Iceberg Lake cirque ahead

 

Lots of bear grass and bright flowers dot the steep meadow lands as we continue climbing. Then the trail starts dropping into the cirque as we approach Icebeg Lake.

 

Beargrass everywhere

Beargrass everywhere

 

Iceberg Lake Trail

Iceberg Lake Trail rich in colorful flowers

 

Flowered rocks near Iceberg Lake

Flowered rock formations near Iceberg Lake

 

Approaching Iceberg Lake

Approaching Iceberg Lake

 

One of the icebergs in Iceberg Lake

One of the icebergs in Iceberg Lake

 

Iceberg Lake Notch

Iceberg Lake Notch with the snow and ice chute

 

Iceberg Creek

Iceberg Creek

 

Above Iceberg Creek, Iceberg Peak can be seen.  Time to retrace our steps and head back down to assess the Ptarmigan Trail as an add-on hike.

 

Leaving the cirque

Leaving the Iceberg Lake cirque

 

Heading down, Mt. Henkel in background

Heading down, Mt. Henkel in background

 

We reached the junction with Ptarmigan Trail and decided to hike it up to the Lake, but probably no further. The Tunnel was another mile or so beyond the Lake, and Elizabeth Lake a few more miles beyond the tunnel. It was a steep hike up to the Lake, so we took a break and enjoyed the view before starting back down.

 

Ptarmigan Lake

Ptarmigan Lake

 

We no sooner pulled out our energy bars and water, when we were joined by a big, fat marmot. I bet he weighed five pounds! And look at the claws on this guy!

 

Marmot (1)

Marmot (1)

 

Marmot (2)

Marmot (2)

 

Marmot (3)

Marmot (3)

 

And he was after a handout; imagine that! Any hiker that stops to look at the Lake has probably met this fat fellow! Leave your pack unattended, and they will chew right through it to get at food or whatever smells good. Hikers beware!

 

Ptarmigan Creek just below the Lake

Ptarmigan Creek just below the Lake

 

Finishing our break, we hit the trail again and headed back down. We ran into deer along the trail which tended to slow us down. Finally we reached the junction with Iceberg Trail, and continued on down. We still had about 2.5 miles to go and were getting anxious to get back to the cabins, clean up and have dinner.

It wasn’t long and we spotted a big moose laying under a shade tree near Wilbur Creek.

 

Moose resting on a hot day

Moose resting on a hot day near Wilbur Creek

 

We stopped for some pictures then continued back down to the cabins. It was a very good day on the trail. We’d hiked about twelve miles and enjoyed beautiful scenery from start to finish.

We decided to hike over to Many Glacier and purchase tickets for a boat ride in the morning. The boats would take us to a Grinnell Glacier Trailhead. We weren’t quite sure of the status of the Grinnell Trail near the top, in terms of snow and ice, but we figured we’d hike as far as possible and maybe make it all the way.

 

Grand View from Many Glacier

Grand View from Many Glacier – Heavy Shield (center)

 

The above view from Many Glacier shows Heavy Shield (Wilbur) in the center, with the Iceberg Lake Cirque to the right in the background. We couldn’t see the two locations together like this from Swiftcurrent Inn, so it was a nice surprise. Notice Iceberg peak.

We purchased our tickets. The ‘Chief Two Guns’ would take us from Many Glacier up to the far end of Swiftcurrent Lake where we would dis-embark, hike a quarter mile, and get on another boat. The ‘Morning Eagle’  would then take us across Lake Josephine, where  we would start the hike up to  Grinnell Glacier.

We returned to Swiftcurrent Inn, boat tickets in hand, ready for a new adventure in the morning. I enjoyed a cold Big Sky, Scape Goat beer on the deck outside the restaurant, then met the ladies for dinner. What a day!

 

Swiftcurrent Lake dock, headed for the glaciers

Swiftcurrent Lake dock, headed for the glaciers

 

'Chief Two Guns' taking us across Swiftcurrent Lake

‘Chief Two Guns’ taking us across Swiftcurrent Lake

 

Lake Josephine with Mt. Gould in background

Lake Josephine with Mt. Gould in background

 

Crossing Lake Josephine, Salamander Glacier above

Crossing Lake Josephine, Salamander Glacier above

 

Hiking up and out of Lake Josephine

Hiking up and out of Lake Josephine

 

Grinnell Lake (1)

Grinnell Lake (1)

 

Unknown waterfall along Grinnell Glacier Trail

Unknown waterfall along Grinnell Glacier Trail

 

We met a Ranger along the trail and were very happy to hear that the trail was deemed ‘open’ all the way to Grinnell Glacier earlier that day. He said they had a crew up there clearing it the day before, because people were going around the ‘closed’ signs and damaging the vegetation, to say nothing of endangering themselves in the process. We were happy hikers!

 

Grinnell Lake (2)

Grinnell Lake (2)

 

Grinnell Glacier visible above the Lake.

 

Taking a shower on the way to Grinnell Glacier

Taking a shower on the way to Grinnell Glacier

 

The day was hot, the trail long, the water from this waterfall -COLD! Guaranteed to wake you up, and restore your energy in the half-minute or less that it will take to get through it. And you’d be dry again in twenty minutes!

 

Grinnell Lake (3)

Grinnell Lake (3)

 

Grinnell Glacier

Grinnell Glacier, but we’re not there yet

 

That’s Grinnell on the left, with a portion of Salamander on the right, above.

 

Approacking Grinnell Glacier

Approaching Grinnell Glacier

 

Grinnell Glacier below, Salamander Glacier above

Grinnell Glacier below, Salamander Glacier above

 

Salamander above, Grinnell below

Salamander above, Grinnell below

 

 

Grinnell Falls

Grinnell Falls

 

 

Grinnell Lake, Josephine and Swiftcurrent

Grinnell Lake, Josephine and Swiftcurrent

 

Hiking back down, we see where we’ve come from. Swiftcurrent Inn and Cabins is just over the hill on the distant horizon. It’s always easier going down, for me anyway. One hell of a good hike today!

 

Flowers growing in rock

Flowers growing in rock

 

Life is fragile; it can be tough in this environment; only the strong survive, and all that stuff! In the morning we depart Swiftcurrent and drive west on ‘Going to the Sun Road.’ We leave early in an effort to avoid traffic; it’s a two-three hour drive. Alas, we’re faced with heavy fog and can’t see much of the beauty around us. We drive by Saint Mary Lake, stop for a picture of Wild Goose Island, and are on the road to Missoula in no time.

 

Wild Goose Island, Saint Mary Lake

Wild Goose Island, Saint Mary Lake

 

We drive south past Flathead Lake, stopping for lunch in Polson, where the annual cherry festival was being celebrated. It was like a county fair right in the middle of town, and parking was scarce. It was almost as busy as some of the popular trails in Glacier.

We had two rooms reserved in Missoula. We thought we were going to tour a whiskey distillery, but ended up in a tasting room -oh well! We visited a vineyard, and did more tasting. Then we explored the town a bit. I’ve always liked Missoula, and now the ‘ladies like it too!

 

Montgomery Rye Whiskey Tasting

Montgomery Rye Whiskey Tasting

 

Bernice's Bakery

Bernice’s Bakery, the ladie’s favorite!

 

The ladies would fly out early next morning and my buddy, Jack would fly in about noon. We’d be heading south through Butte and Bozeman, following the Yellowstone River south to the northeast entrance of Yellowstone NP at Gardiner. And the story continues…

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Additional Resources:

Last Stand: George Bird Grinnell, the Battle to Save the Buffalo, and the Birth of the New West Paperback – September 1, 2009

Blackfeet Tales of Glacier National Park, James Willard Schultz, Paperback – July 31, 2016  

Blackfeet Indian Stories, by George Bird Grinnell, Paperback – October 9, 2010

 

 

About Mike Hohmann

I did lots of camping/hiking as a kid in the Scouts, and I still strive to 'be prepared.' After high school, I got bored with more school and enlisted in the Army Corps. of Engineers, doing two tours in Vietnam. Post military, I completed BS and MBA degrees and spent several decades with Corporate America, working mostly in the areas of conventional and renewable energy. I also spent over a decade as a self-employed small business consultant in marketing and finance. As a young family man with a wife and two kids, we spent many vacations camping and hiking in northern Minnesota. I spent additional long weekends fishing the rivers and camping/hiking along the North Shore of Lake Superior. I retired early and hit the trails hard-- in the lower-48, Alaska, and western Canada. These days I backpack, car-camp and day-hike, go snowshoeing, and try to get the grand-kids out to teach them the ways of the trail. Other interests include American Revolutionary War and Civil War history, 19th and 20th century firearms, Native American history; business and macroeconomics. I'm a recently-licensed amateur (Ham) radio operator, and I look forward to many radio-related adventures in coming months. Life is good! Member, Superior Hiking Trail Association; Member, Appalachian Mountain Club; Member, REI; Member, ARRL- Amateur Radio Relay League, the National Assoc. for Amateur Radio; Twin Cities Metro Skywarn Spotter; Twin City FM Club; Richfield Amateur Radio Club; QRP ARCI, Low-Power Amateur Radio Club International; Honorary Member, Toronto QRP Society; Life Member, National Rifle Association
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6 Responses to A 14 Year Reunion in Glacier NP

  1. ray says:

    sounds great ! re snow, ice and glaciers, did you get any info from rangers etc about whether normal or more or less than ??

  2. I wonder if it was Ranger Lyle! Not a tall man, kind of slender, 86 years old. It would make a lot of sense to have him give talks. That man has a head full of stories from his years.

    Looks like a great trip!

    • Mike Hohmann says:

      I had to go back and check with others in our group… our ‘old Ranger’ was Doug. And he too had a ‘head full of stories from his years.’ Hell, I’m not that old yet, but sit me around a campfire, and I’ve got ‘a head full of stories from my years too.’ It ain’t that bad getting old I guess… we just get older and wiser… hopefully!! 😉 Thx for the feedback Jennifer.

  3. ourhousein says:

    Great photos and tours of Glacier. Thanks for the comments at Our House In!

    • Mike Hohmann says:

      Thanks for visiting, and be sure to stop in again soon. I too enjoyed your travel adventures around the USA and in Mexico. I usually post 4-5 times a month, but that schedule seems to slip during summer months when I spend more time on the trail.

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